University of Witwatersrand

Total 9 Posts

South Africa to amend outdated copyright law

South Africa's copyright law must not continue ignoring the principles of fair use.

An engineers guide to predicting the 2018 FIFA World Cup winner

As a civil engineer I’m fascinated by predictions of who will win the FIFA World Cup finals in Russia, seeing that we use predictions on a regular basis in engineering. For the finals, there’s a wide variety of forecasts. In addition to armchair fans’ predictions, there are those

Ancient DNA changes our knowledge about the evolution of Afrikan elephants

For a long time, zoologists assumed that there were only two species of elephant: one Asian and one African. Then genetic analyses suggested that the African Elephant could be divided into two distinct species, the African Forest and African Savannah elephants. Now a new elephant has been added to the

How a lost Afrikan city was recreated with laser technology

There are lost cities all over the world. Some, like the remains of Mayan cities hidden beneath a thick canopy of rainforest in Mesoamerica, are found with the help of laser lights. Now the same technology which located those Mayan cities has been used to rediscover a southern African city

Raising awareness about the importance of Afrika’s fossil heritage

Palaeontology, like much else in the cultural landscape, has a strong western influence and bias. Students are more likely than not to be given textbooks and external readings from Europe and North America no matter where they are in the world. I often think about my own experiences as a

It's in everybody’s interests to regulate cryptocurrencies

There are growing calls for regulation of the cryptocurrency market, which is rapidly approaching a market capitalisation of $1 trillion. But there’s little agreement about the forms this should take. If the case for government regulation is strong, the case for a clear, coordinated regulatory approach is even stronger.

One of the world’s most famous fossil skulls is actually male and not female as initially thought by South African paleontologists

More than 70 years ago two paleontologists named Robert Broom and John Robinson discovered a skull at the Sterkfontein Caves near Johannesburg. They nicknamed the skull, which is believed to be about 2.5 million years old, “Mrs Ples”. Its scientific name is Australopithecus africanus, and it’s extremely significant